pipes in winter

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pipes in winter

Postby creekside » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:36 am

In the original part of my trailer, the previous owner switched the bathroom and furnace locations. Being able to get underneath this part of my trailer, I noticed the underbelly was cut open to access the plumbing fixtures. Before I seal up the slashes with the recommended tape, do I need to protect my pipes more? I can see pink insulation at the opening but this is an opportunity for me to buff the area up before sealing. I plan on cleaning the area with alcohol and mega taping.
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby Greg » Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:44 pm

The original lay out would have been to run the pipes near the heat ducts to keep them warm. If you are going to continue heating with the furnace they will most likely be OK there as long as the insulation & belly are both in good shape.

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Re: pipes in winter

Postby jency » Thu Apr 14, 2011 12:17 am

Cold winter months can cause pipes to freeze and burst. Some insurance policies will not pay claims unless prior care was taken to prevent freezing. The Brunswick Fire Department says to avoid frozen pipes, flooding and costly repairs:
Check and insulate pipes in unheated areas, basement, crawl space and exterior walls. These usually freeze first.Drain outside faucets which are susceptible. Cut off water inside that controls the faucet, then open the faucet handle and allow the remaining water to drain out.If you will be away from your house, leave your heating thermostat at a reasonable temperature and open faucets to let them drip slightly. This may prevent freezing.

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Re: pipes in winter

Postby jpingram5 » Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:33 pm

Just use regular pipe foam insulation and fill in with more insulation if you think it needs more there. You should be fine given you run your forced air heat during the winter months.
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby Greg » Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:51 pm

The problem with insulating pipes in heated area is that not only are you insulating against the cold, but if they should freeze they are also insulated from the heat.

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Re: pipes in winter

Postby jpingram5 » Sat Apr 16, 2011 5:38 pm

I've heard guys say about insulating the pipes can cause them to freeze quicker. I have not ever seen such a case but my method is I leave the hot pipe spaced with limited insulation and completely insulate the cold pipes so this lets little heat radiate from the pipe. Given your underbelly is intact and the duct system works fine and they insulated underneath pretty good you should not have a problem.
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby WildIrish » Tue May 10, 2011 10:36 pm

jency wrote:If you will be away from your house, leave your heating thermostat at a reasonable temperature and open faucets to let them drip slightly. This may prevent freezing.

I know I'm late to the party here, but letting faucets drip in a MH is a recipe for disaster. The previous owners of my MH did that, resulting in expensive repairs from burst pipes. :(
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby DaveyB » Fri May 13, 2011 4:29 am

Also late to the party here, but in the case you are going to be away for some time, consider installing a drain valve in the water line, just after the main shut-off valve. Before leaving, simply close the supply valve, open the drain valve, and open all the faucets in the home, staring with the furthest, blow them through with an air line, then close them again.

No water in the pipes = nothing to freeze!! On returning to the home, close the drain valve, open the supply valve and bleed off each faucet in turn - takes about 5 minutes to do, which is a lot less than replacing split water lines and repairing all the water damage!

Lets see a stick home owner try that!!
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby joedirt63 » Fri May 13, 2011 6:07 am

funny you should say that davey cause that was my job every year with my dad's summer home in seaside. it was a 2 bed stick home about the size of a double wide. we had our own well and propane set up with crawl space under it. basicly it was a very very well constucted m/f with out the I beams and had a full foundation. evry fall when we closed it was my job to drain every thing ,which included the well pump witch was ona cement pad under the house,so yeah it was a stick home and yeah i did do it. heh heh . spent my whole youth down there. maybe that's why i'm more comfortable in a m/h cause the bungalow was so much like one.
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby dayguild » Mon May 16, 2011 7:38 am

For Davey B
Could you tell me how you blow out your water lines? Do you do it yourself? Maybe a compressor??
Thanx
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Re: pipes in winter

Postby DaveyB » Wed May 18, 2011 6:27 am

I have a compressor - I bought it originally to top up the pressure on my motorcycle tires since many gas station compressors seem to struggle with anything over 35lb/sq.inch . I use an adaptor (an old bicycle inner tube and valve) which seats nicely over the faucet and gives me a valve to which to connect the compressor.

My compressor is a rechargeable unit and goes to 230lb/sq.inch, so clearing the water lines is a breeze (literally!). On the other hand, it will also inflate a car tire from dead flat to fully inflated in a matter of minutes, and it doesn't even have to be plugged in, just have the battery charged!
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